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They Say It, and It’s True

Today is my birthday! I firmly believe birthdays are New Years Day for each soul that’s chosen to live on this funny place we call Earth, and so what we do on them sets the tone for a whole year. Already I have been writing, drinking strong coffee with cream, and shaking a tail feather to smoovegroove R&B while raising my toothbrush to such astrotwins as Cindy Sherman and Dolly Parton. Love this life madly with all its scars and stars, so glad I’ve made it thus far, and looking forward to sharing bright light with even more of you in my new year. I am always very grateful to write this blog, and so appreciative of all who take the time to read it.

Lux Lotus and Ruby Intuition for a New Year

Savvy media strategist and girl-about-town Lauren Cerand and I discussed my intuition practice for her blog, the swoony Lux Lotus. We covered everything under the pale winter sun, from the invention of timepieces to the superior psychic abilities of animals, and suffice it to say that she is so awfully brilliant that she makes everyone else seem so as well. Do check it out, kittens.

On Living Softly, and Not Carrying a Big Stick

Portrait of the Artist as a Young Thug

Growing up, “soft” was an insult. The ultimate one, actually. In my family it was an umbrella term that meant out-of-shape, clueless, indolent, addled, unvigilant, prissy, overly sensitive, entitled. You were soft if you didn’t take it in the chin. Soft if you asked for a ride when you could walk. Soft if you whined “I can’t.” Soft if you couldn’t run a mile or sported a gut. Soft if you cried when you dropped your ice cream. Definitely soft if you were a tattletale.

Every usage of the word was anathema to us, and by “us,” I am referring to my dad and therefore my little sister, my mother, my myself—my father’s subjects, in other words, to whom principles came down by edict.

Soft hands meant you lacked a work ethic, the might or tenacity to do physical labor. A soft voice meant you were namby-pamby, couldn’t assert yourself. Being soft-hearted meant you were a sucker. There was a long list of what was soft, and at the top of it were the rich people in my Greater Boston town, which literally had a “wrong side of the tracks” since the Mass Pike divided the more working-class sections from the wealthier people on the Hill. The rich girls wore rugbys and braids, had sleepover parties with cutesie PJs, whispered about their crushes. The girls in my neighborhood wore tight designer jeans and feathered hair, hung out at the corner store, had boyfriends with whom they did more than hold hands long before they hit puberty.

Though gentle, Charlie Bucket was not soft, which is why he inherited the Chocolate Factory. Harriet the Spy was not soft; all you had to do was look at her work uniform and you knew she was tough as nails. In those slippers and knitted sweaters, Mister Rogers and his braying singsong was ridiculously soft. And the Beatles, oy the Beatles. With their thin voices, those fa-la-la proclamations of love—forget it. So soft. As a matter of fact, all white music was soft, except punk rock and, of course, the Stones. With their big bass lines and bigger tongues, the Rolling Stones were hard in every sense of the word. Before I even understood what sex entailed, I groked that the Beatles were the equivalent of making love and the Stones were all about fucking. Which, by definition, was not soft. Continue Reading →

"All, everything I understand, I understand only because I love."
― Leo Tolstoy